Architects.org published an important article in their Winter 2017 (See Media - Articles) which gives an excellent description of the Zeoform process:

 

"Zeoform’s process is designed to accept a wide range of feedstocks. In their ZEO prototype factory in Mullumbimby, south of Brisbane, [they] use a variety of wood- and fabric-based materials—such as paper, jute, bamboo, hemp, and agricultural biomass—in both virgin and recycled states, grinding and mixing them with water to create a pulpy substance resembling wet dough.

 

In terms of equipment, ZEO relies primarily on a paper disk refiner for feedstock preparation in combination with custom steam explosion and enzymatic processing methods. “The process transforms the right matrix of fibers into a porridgy pulp which can be poured, pressed, sprayed, sculpted, and molded,” says Wheeler. Once hardened and dried, the material can be used as a functional substitute for many commercial-grade petroleum-based resins including acrylic; polyvinyl chloride, or PVC; and nylon.

The Zeoform process aspires to create materials as nature does, using the most prevalent organic substance on the planet—cellulose—which comprises approximately one-third of all plant matter. Technically speaking, the manufacture aims to optimize the surface area of cellulose fibers in order to develop hydroxyl bonding, a chemical phenomenon in which glucose chains form a strong adhesion with neighboring chains. Both hydroxyl bonding and entanglement bonding—where the cellulose fibers form tight knots—generate significant strength and resilience, as seen at a microscale in the cell walls of plants.

Zeoform may be combined with various natural compounds like dyes, substrates, minerals, and reinforcing fibers to achieve particular results relating to aesthetic and/or mechanical performance. Some samples resemble petroleum-based plastic while others are reminiscent of stone, metal, or wood. High-density variants of Zeoform are intrinsically water and fire resistant, and the company is developing new coatings capable of resisting harsh environmental conditions.